Blurred vision

By Tedler D. Depaynos, MD

“ Optometrists are experts of the eye but they are not Doctors of Medicine. They may be good in diagnosing eye problems but from what we know, they cannot prescribe eye medications even just mere eyedrops. They were then limited to prescribing eye glasses.“

The gentleman is in a profession where he deals with a lot of legal papers. He transferred his practice to the lowlands when he was invited to share his expertise by a new university. There was a time as noticed by his secretaries when he started taking time reading and signing the papers and they concluded that he was getting meticulous. They also began double checking the papers they typed and print before they passed them to him for final review and signing.
They later observed him to be bringing the papers close to his eyes as he read them and there were times when he had to ask the secretary just adjacent to him to point the space where he had to place his signature. They were eventually with smiles when they finally concluded that his vision was getting blurred. They then pleaded him to visit a popular neighboring optometrist.
Optometrists are experts of the eye but they are not Doctors of Medicine. They may be good in diagnosing eye problems but from what we know, they cannot prescribe eye medications even just mere eyedrops. They were then limited to prescribing eye glasses.
Our professional gentleman has a little improvement in his eye vision with the expensive glasses he was wearing so that when he inadvertently expressed his problem to an elderly colleague in the university with thick eyeglasses, he was advised to consult an ophthalmologist. The elderly colleague was wondering if his students noticed his eye problem.
Ophthalmologists are Doctors of Medicine who specialize on the eyes. He was diagnosed to have “cataract” which is “opacification of the lens of the eyes”. Although the ophthalmologist thru his hightech instruments appreciated it in both eyes, only the left appeared to be more advanced so that it is the only one that needed immediate surgery. As a rule, however, they do not operate on both eyes in removing the opacified eye lenses at the same time because if something unfortunate happens to the surgical procedure the patient might have both eyes blind.
Actually, the neighboring optometrist gave a similar impression but advised him to try eyeglasses first because it may improve his vision.
There may be various causes of cataract but the eye MD was only entertaining senility as the cause hence he named it “senile cataract”. It was good the brain cells of his patient were far from being senile. Perhaps, his busy schedule was making them constantly active.
The “opaque eye lens” would be removed and an artificial one would be implanted to replace it. The vision may then return to normal. His elderly client who advised him to consult an ophthalmologist underwent removal of his cataract lens more than a decade ago but no implant was done. He was just prescribed thick eyeglasses which he described to be as thick as the base of a glass he used for drinking.
Except for his secretaries, nobody knew he underwent ophthalmic surgery which was uneventful. The following month was his birthday and practically all of his guests felt that he appeared younger and he could recognize all of them even from a distance. His sense of hearing also appeared more sensitive. Actually, this is the observation of some ophthalmologists, patients getting blind tend to concentrate more on their hearing so that their sense of hearing appears to be more precise.
It is now several years and his secretaries never observed him to have a problem in his vision again. Presently, however, they sometimes noticed him to be covering his eyes alternately while reading as if he was comparing their vision. Perhaps, even if the other unoperated eye is also getting more blurred the normal vision of the operated other eye may be compensating.**

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